Project Overview

The Giving Cycle - Glenview Community Center Outdoor Pool

Painter Deborah Brown and metal artist John Argroves designed metal gates for the east entry using a forest scene created in copper, bronze and steel. The doors behind the gates contain stained glass also using the tree and forest theme. The portico ceiling above has metallic leaf enhancements attached to them as well as sconces reflecting the tree theme and help to connect the gates and the door.

Artist Deborah Brown uses abstraction to supplant the viewer into cool and serenity, a repose from the heat of summer.

The public art project at the Glenview Community Center Outdoor Pool is titled The Giving Cycle. It is comprised of a welcoming canopy that references trees and nature in bronze, as well as stained glass windows with decorative patterns. The gate of the Glenview Community Center seems as aquatic as the pool it leads to. The artist’s stainless steel and copper design is comprised of a framework that shows two tree trunks on either side of the entryway. Between them, individually shaped leaves appear to float on the surface of organically shaped, vertical bars reminiscent of tree branches. At the bottom a series of hands dances across the oxidized copper sheath. Artist Deborah Brown uses abstraction to supplant the viewer into cool and serenity, a repose from the heat of summer.

Bounds and Gillespie architects designed the building for the Glenview Community Center Outdoor Pool. The UrbanArt Commission facilitated the public art enhancement project for the City of Memphis Public Art Program.

 

About the Artist

Deborah Brown

Deborah Brown is a painter who lives and works in New York where she is represented by Lesley Heller Workspace. Her show, "The Bushwick Paintings," was shown at the gallery in January/February 2011. Since 2006 she has had a studio in Bushwick, where she started STOREFRONT gallery. She also serves on the board of Momenta and NURTUREart, two alternative, not-for-profit spaces in Brooklyn. 

In addition to her work as a painter, she has completed several public art projects around the country, including a suite of mosaics fabricated for the Houston Street subway station in Manhattan for the MTA; glass roundels for the Royal Caribbean Cruise Terminal at the Port of Miami for Miami-Dade Art-in-Public Places; a frieze for PS 178 in Manhattan for NYC's Percent for Art Program; a mural and stairway inserts for NJ Transit for the Garfield Avenue Station in Jersey City, NJ, on Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Transit line; and, most recently, a suite of mosaics for the newly completed Animal Shelter in Memphis for UrbanArt Commission.